CATARACT SURGERY FAQs

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What exactly is a cataract?

A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens due to protein build up. This natural lens, which lies between the front and back areas of the eye, allows light to pass through the eye to the retina. A cataract, or cloudy natural lens, blocks light from passing through the eye and distorts your vision.
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Are cataracts found only in older people?

About half of the population has a cataract by age 65, and nearly everyone over 75 has at least one. But in rare cases, infants can have congenital cataracts. These are usually related to the mother having German measles, chickenpox, or another infectious disease during pregnancy, and sometimes they are inherited. Certain medications can also cause premature development of cataracts.
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My doctor says I have a cataract, but he wants to wait a while before removing it. Why?

A cataract usually starts very small and practically unnoticeable but grows gradually larger and cloudier.You need to continue to visit your eye doctor regularly so the cataract’s progress is monitored. Some cataracts never really reach the stage where they should be removed. If your cataract is interfering with your vision to the point where it is unsafe to drive, or doing everyday tasks is difficult, then it’s time to seriously consider removing it.
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Is cataract surgery serious?

All surgery involves some risk, so yes, it is serious. However, cataract surgery is the most commonly performed type of surgery in the United States. Many cataract surgeons have several thousand procedures under their belt. Choosing a surgeon with this much experience will reduce the risk of something going wrong.
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How is a cataract removed?

A small incision is made near the lens of the eye. The surgeon will either remove the lens as is, or use ultrasound, a laser or surgical solution to break it up, and then remove it. The back membrane of the lens (called the posterior capsule) is left in place. Usually, a replacement lens (called an intraocular lens or IOL) is inserted.

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